FAQs

Technical Issues

What is social policy?

Social policy is a sub-set of public policy. It aims to improve human welfare and to meet human needs for education, health, housing and social security and can operate at local, regional, national or supra-national level. It can be implemented by a combination of laws, regulations, advice, public provision and/or public financing.an welfare and to meet human needs for education, health, housing and social security and can operate at local, regional, national or supra-national level. It can be implemented by a combination of laws, regulations, advice, public provision and/or public financing.

 

Don’t economists just deal with money and finances?

No. Economics studies the choices people make when they can’t have everything they want. The fundamental assumption of economics is that everyone will try to get the most satisfaction for themselves given the set of circumstances they face. However, economics has nothing to say about the types of things that bring satisfaction and economists recognise that many people gain satisfaction from the happiness of others. So their choice may involve balancing the happiness/well-being of others against having more consumer goods for themselves.

 

What can economics bring to social policy decisions?

With so many social needs, it is important to make the best use of all our resources – human, environmental and capital. Economics can help policy makers to choose the best course of action by placing values on social outcomes (for example, helping people to stop smoking) so that they can be compared with the costs, which are usually easier to measure.

Why do we need more statistics?

Effective policy decisions need reliable information and statistics provide the basis for that information. Therefore, we don’t necessarily need more statistics but it is important that we have the relevant statistics.

What is the difference between quantitive and qualitative data?

Quantitative data is measurable while qualitative data cannot be graphed or displayed in numerical terms. Qualitative data is usually recorded as text. They tend to be collected by using different methodologies. Quantitative data is usually collected by means of surveys using the same questionnaire for all respondents. Qualitative data is more likely to be collected by a less structured interview of discussion – for example, by means of focus groups – and, therefore, usually collects data from a smaller number of respondents. Quantitative data is particularly helpful for analysing outcomes while qualitative data contributes to the understanding of processes.

 

Operational Issues

What countries do you work in?

We are happy to work in any country that is building its capacity to deliver social policy. As well as all four countries of the UK, we have worked in almost all of the new countries of the EU (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia), other countries in central, south east and eastern Europe (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Russia, Serbia, Ukraine) and the Middle East and North Africa (Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey).

 

Do you have any more training courses planned?

Our training programme is under regular review. Please check our website for updates.

What are the opportunities for employment in Tecis?

We are a small company operated by our owners and at present do not envisage expansion of our workforce. Future opportunities for permanent employment will be published on our website.

Recent Case Studies:

UK - Evaluation of Pupil Premium

International - Operational Plan to Scale up Quality Kindergarten Education in Ghana

Upcoming Courses:

20 October 2016 Durham Economic Analaysis for Social Policy Decisions

23 November 2016 Durham Value for Money Assessment

Contact:

Tel: +44 (0)191 384 7766

email: office@tecisltd.co.uk

Want to know what we are doing?

Check out the blog by Ivy Papps